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Friday, December 05, 2008

Halloween

Updated 12/5 with lots of details.


It started life as a Honey Nut Cheerios box. I used a sheet of thicker cardboard from Hobby Lobby for the bottom back opposite the face part. About 1.5 mm thick. A huge plain piece is like $2 there. Back by the picture frame area near the matting.

Then for the top I put on Durham's Rock hard putty and sanded and painted that. With time, you can make the helmet really smooth but I was pressed for time to make Halloween.


(You can Google both those ingredients.)



Links to the site with tons of patterns are below. For a purist, there are other more accurate patterns there but I think everyone recognizes my version. It's pretty close.

These pieces are just high density foam I glued the pattern to and used an Xacto knife and a dremel with a cutting head for machining the parts I couldn't knife out. Water based acrylic paint.

Hot glued on. There is a bolt that goes through the rangefinder bottom you can't see that is hidden by the top fitting. It is tight enough to stop nicely in the up and down position. There is a stop when it's down to hold it level.

Inside the rangefinder is a blinking red light from a nametag I got somewhere. Quarter sized PCB with an on off button.



The mirror eyepiece is just a piece of window tint. It should be black but I already had the mirrored.


The pistol I painted more realistically later with some silver paint to show spall patterns and chipping. It's a Nerf pistol with the front cut flat to accept the barrel and sight assembly with hot glue attachments.

The barrel is a PVC pipe piece with a smaller pipe inside that is centered with a foam ring I made then hot glued.

The cooling fins are pairs of Q tips with the heads cut off glued together but if you cut pieces from the rubber of a windshield wiper blade it would look cooler.

Drill holes for the cooling shround.

The front sight is a small blade fuse glued prongs up.

The top sight is a cardboard tube from a clothes hangar (like from the dry cleaner) and a washer. It is held on the barrel by more cardboard tubing and hot glue.

I had the wiper blade but ran out of time.

The grenade is a foam ball painted black and dark green with another LED pin I got at a party that flashes patterns when you twist it on in about 3 colors. "He's holding a thermal detonator!" Effective for getting candy or earning higher bounties in distant galaxies.

The armor is from the patterns you can find below and made from cutting a Sterilite trash can and melting with a heat gun for shaping. Paint and affix snaps to the the back with epoxy. You can buy a kit to put snaps on at Wal Mart in the fabric section. Rough up the epoxy so it will stick. JB Weld doesn't stick well to smooth plastic. Use a knife to cross hatch where you are going to put the epoxy.

Makes sure to add a little battle damage and paint that silver for effect. Like gouges and creasing.

Then just snap the armor to the shirt. Kneepads=Roller hockey pads painted black. Flight suit and gloves are my old Air Force issue.

The white logo is just a printout cut with an Xacto to make a pattern with spray paint.

The cape is an old camo poncho doubled over and snapped once around my neck.

Most kids thought it was cool and yet my son was embarrassed by me at
school when I showed up at the bike to "collect the bounty on this one" on Halloween day. He should have 'fought' me like McLovin.

It's only cool to the OTHER kids.

Linkage:

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-cardboard-costume-helmet/

http://www.thedentedhelmet.com/

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