Actors: Sometimes it literally IS about just showing up.

A little backstory:

I've done work with this local production company in the past, and while it's a small shop, it's always FUN and includes a paycheck and a nice lunch. (We've all seen the 'UNPAID' roles on certain sites. LOL.)

So when I saw a post that they needed a background actor, I put in for it because it's always been a good time. This is the 3rd project I've worked on for them. 

I've done nationally airing commercials and TV shows, but I don't consider this role 'beneath me' because who knows? Maybe someday it will be an Easter egg for someone to spot me. And if I think it's fun, I'll consider pretty much anything.

I'll stretch my acting muscles any way I can and any experience IMHO is good experience. This turned out to be even more than that.

I'm just supposed to be 'warehouse worker'. 

Until I show up. Hint hint.

We all sit down. About 1 minute into the conversation, the head guy (he wears several hats and signs the checks), turns to me and says "Hey Rob, we don't have a 'Jason', do you want to handle that?"

I say "no problem" and get a copy of the script.

The conversation content also included something about 'people not showing up', and 'it's always the morning of' when they no show you.

IMHO, this would be, I imagine, the #1 way to tick off a director/producer/etc. It's a small industry, so don't do that.

I don't know who all didn't show up, but it sounds like more than one person.

This is also not the first time I've heard this. I've heard it on multiple sets. Perhaps it's my military/airline captain/engineer background but I do NOT get this concept.

Anyway, what happens is this:


I end up front and center of the camera and one of two main characters the scene hinges on.

SHOW UP. It pays in multiple ways. It's not just an acting lesson, it's a life lesson.

If you want to see it when the project is out. give me a follow at these two spots:






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